House Small Business Committee

Chabot, Connolly Introduce Bill to Help More Small Businesses Export

House Small Business Committee News - Thu, 06/02/2016 - 12:00am

Chabot, Connolly Introduce Bill to Help More Small Businesses Export

WASHINGTON – Small Business Committee Chairman Steve Chabot (R-OH) and Congressman Gerry Connolly (D-VA) have introduced H.R. 2586, the Export Coordination Act of 2015, a bill to improve the coordination of federal export promotion resources and to streamline the export process so that more small businesses can sell goods overseas.

“When it comes to exporting, most small businesses don’t know where to start,” said Chabot. “The process can be incredibly complex and the federal resources that are supposed to help them navigate the process are just as intimidating. The Export Coordination Act would streamline these resources and take steps to make the process easier for businesses.

Chabot added, “It is my hope that this bill – and other solutions that the Small Business Committee is currently working on – will open the door for more small businesses to sell their goods overseas, which ultimately provides more opportunities for working families.”

Congressman Connolly said, “The federal government stands ready to help small businesses access foreign markets and create jobs through exports. This bill will ensure that federal trade promotion agencies are reaching out to state and local partners and making access to these resources as straightforward as possible.

U.S. exports support more than 38 million American jobs – including 1 in 3 manufacturing jobs.  Despite the fact that 95 percent of the world’s consumers live outside of the United States, only 2 percent of all small businesses export their goods.

H.R. 2586 would require the United States Department of Commerce’s Trade Promotion Coordinating Committee (TPCC) to clearly define each federal agency’s role in the export process, establish a central listing of all trade events, give state trade agencies a voice in setting our national export strategy, and reduce overlap of current export resources. 

###

The Sharing Economy: A Taxing Experience for New Entrepreneurs, Part II

House Small Business Committee News - Thu, 05/26/2016 - 10:00am
Chairman Steve Chabot has scheduled a hearing of the Committee on Small Business titled, “The Sharing Economy:  A Taxing Experience for New Entrepreneurs, Part II.” The hearing is scheduled to begin at 10:00 A.M. on Thursday, May 26, 2016 in Room 2360 of the Rayburn House Office Building.

Hearing Materials
1. Hearing Notice
2. Witness List
3. Hearing Memo

Witness List

"Beyond unacceptable, it is absurd”

House Small Business Committee News - Thu, 05/26/2016 - 12:00am

National Taxpayer Advocate: IRS Not Helping Entrepreneurs in the Sharing Economy


WASHINGTON
– The National Taxpayer Advocate told members of the House Small Business Committee today that the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has not been helping Americans navigate tax rules and regulations in the new sharing economy. Today’s hearing was the second in a two-part series held by the Committee examining tax compliance challenges for entrepreneurs in the sharing economy.

“When the IRS is behind the times, it puts small businesses behind the eight ball,” said House Small Business Committee Chairman Steve Chabot (R-OH). “This failure has left on-demand platform companies and their workers confused and frustrated as they try to do the right thing and pay the taxes they owe.”

“Here’s the real kicker: many on-demand companies say they would gladly provide tax compliance training but they don’t because they are afraid the IRS will reclassify their relationship and subject them to whole new host of regulations and obligations,” Chairman Chabot observed. 

“Congressional committees like ours have a duty to provide robust oversight of the IRS and ensure they are providing small businesses with clarity and treating them fairly,” Chabot added.

THE NATIONAL TAXPAYER ADVOCATE’S VIEW

“If a person working in the sharing economy called the IRS toll free line today, he or she would hear a recording saying the IRS is not answering any tax law questions after April 15th, so please check IRS dot gov,” testified Nina Olson, the National Taxpayer Advocate at the IRS. “The same message is given to people asking questions at IRS walk-in sites. For a tax agency to not answer questions from taxpayers trying to learn what they need to do to comply is beyond unacceptable, it’s absurd.” 

Under current IRS rules, Olson explained, “An Airbnb host would have to sift through a 24 page publication 527 residential rental property and an Uber driver would have to navigate through the 50 page publication 463 travel, entertainment, gift and car expenses and they still might not understand how these rules apply to themselves as service providers in the sharing economy.”

You can read full testimony from today’s hearing here and watch full video of the hearing here

Overdue: Chabot, Chaffetz Press OMB on Paperwork Reduction Requirements

House Small Business Committee News - Thu, 05/26/2016 - 12:00am

WASHINGTON—House Small Business Committee Chairman Steve Chabot (R-Ohio), joined by House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) today asked the Office and Management and Budget for a long overdue status update on the federal paperwork burden.

Chairmen Chabot and Chaffetz, whose Committees have jurisdiction over the Paperwork Reduction Act, pointed out to OMB Director Shaun Donovan that “the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is required to annually submit a report to Congress on the paperwork burden imposed on individuals, small businesses and others by federal agencies and efforts to reduce those burdens.”

As Chabot and Chaffetz noted, “OMB’s report, which it calls the Information Collection Budget, is long overdue. Congress did not receive a report in 2015.” 

Read full text of the letter here.

May 26, 2016

The Honorable Shaun Donovan
Director
Office of Management and Budget
Washington, D.C. 20503

Dear Director Donovan:

            As Chairmen of the Committees with jurisdiction over the Paperwork Reduction Act,

5 U.S.C. §§ 3501-21 (PRA), we write to inquire about the Office of Management and Budget’s annual report on the federal paperwork burden.  Pursuant to the PRA, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is required to annually submit a report to Congress on the paperwork burden imposed on individuals, small businesses, and others by federal agencies and efforts to reduce those burdens. OMB’s report, which it calls the Information Collection Budget, is long overdue. 

Congress did not receive a report in 2015.  The last report that OMB issued was in 2014 and covered the paperwork burden imposed on the public in Fiscal Year (FY) 2013. We are concerned that OMB is not fulfilling its obligations under the PRA.  Congress needs the Information Collection Budget to evaluate the overall federal paperwork burden and determine whether legislative changes are necessary to ensure the PRA operates as Congress intended.  Therefore, we request that OMB provide the following information:

1.      Why did OMB fail to issue a report to Congress on the federal paperwork burden in 2015?

2.      On what date will OMB publish the Information Collection Budget that covers the federal paperwork burdens for FY 2014?

3.      On what date will OMB publish the Information Collection Budget that covers the federal paperwork burdens for FY 2015?

4.      Please explain how OMB will ensure that it provides Congress with an annual report on the federal paperwork burden as required by 5 U.S.C. § 3514 from now on. 

5.      Please provide all policies and guidance documents explaining how OMB approves information collection requests.

Please provide your responses no later than June 23, 2016


Sincerely,

Steve Chabot                                                                          
Chairman                                                                                
Committee on Small Business

Jason Chaffetz
Chairman
Committee on Oversight and Government Reform                                              

cc:  The Honorable Howard Shelanski, Administrator
Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget

The Sharing Economy: A Taxing Experience for New Entrepreneurs, Part I

House Small Business Committee News - Tue, 05/24/2016 - 11:00am
Chairman Steve Chabot has scheduled a hearing of the Committee on Small Business titled, “The Sharing Economy:  A Taxing Experience for New Entrepreneurs, Part I.” The hearing is scheduled to begin at 11:00 A.M. on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 in Room 2360 of the Rayburn House Office Building.

Hearing Materials
1. Hearing Notice
2. Witness List
3. Hearing Memo

Witness List

Ms. Caroline Bruckner
Executive-in-Residence, Accounting and Taxation
Managing Director, Kogod Tax Policy Center
Washington, DC
Testimony

Mr. Rob Willey
VP Marketing
TaskRabbit
San Francisco, CA
Testimony

Mr. Morgan Reed
Executive Director
ACT  The App Association
Washington, DC
Testimony

Mr. Joe Kennedy
Senior Fellow
Information Technology and Innovation Foundation
Washington, DC
Testimony

An Uber-Taxing Experience for New Entrepreneurs

House Small Business Committee News - Tue, 05/24/2016 - 12:00am

TaskRabbit, Experts Describe Challenges of the Sharing Economy to Congress

WASHINGTON – A representative for the on-demand platform company TaskRabbit told the House Small Business Committee today that the current tax, regulatory and legal climate threatens the success of entrepreneurs in the new sharing economy. The panel of experts described to lawmakers the bevy of new tax compliance challenges faced by small employers, employees and their customers as they navigate the online, app-driven sharing economy.

“No matter what you call it, the sharing economy is changing the face of American entrepreneurship and small businesses before our very eyes,” said House Small Business Committee Chairman Steve Chabot (R-OH). “The dizzying pace of this change has presented many new opportunities and new challenges for the millions of Americans who participate in it.”

“These new platforms have dramatically changed the way companies provide goods and services, giving their workers unprecedented freedom and independence. However, in their enthusiasm, these entrepreneurs are running smack-dab into the buzz-saw of an outmoded tax code that is not designed to accommodate them,” observed Chabot.

“Unfortunately, the IRS has not been part of the solution for entrepreneurs in navigating this new sharing economy. Too often, it has been part of the problem. Our current tax system isn’t working for these new small businesses. In many ways, it is working against them. We can do better, we must do better,” Chabot added.

ENTREPRENEURS TASK WASHINGTON WITH TAX & REGULATORY REFORM

“Tax compliance is just one area of many where our Taskers could benefit from better training. Our Taskers also are looking for direction on how to better market themselves and their services, access health care, and plan for retirement,” testified Rob Willey, the Vice President of Marketing for TaskRabbit.“We at TaskRabbit would like to be a resource, a partner, and a collaborator for that training – it is one of our main areas of focus in determining what types of services we can provide for our Taskers. We hesitate to pursue the kinds of training services we want to provide simply because the threat of litigation and the risks tied to worker classification laws and regulations at the federal and state level are real.”

Pointing to a proposal by economist Joseph V. Kennedy, who also testified at today’s hearing, Willey called for a legal and regulatory “time-out” for new sharing economy companies.

“In the early years of the Internet, Congress imposed a moratorium on federal and state taxation of Internet transactions. Doing so helped a young, nascent sector of the economy develop and provide real benefits for consumers,” explained Willey. “A limited period of legal and regulatory relief would enable platform economy companies to pursue innovative ways to develop and provide services and benefits to those small business owners and entrepreneurs who utilize platform services.”

“What we want to avoid is a situation in which the burdens of tax compliance become so great that it forces Taskers to scale back on their tasks, if not compel them to leave the network altogether,” added Willey.

NEW STUDY: SMALL BIZ GETTING “SHORT-CHANGED” IN SHARING ECONOMY

“The current tax administration system isn’t working for a significant percentage of on-demand platform small business operators or Treasury or IRS,” noted Caroline Bruckner, the Managing Director of the Kogod Tax Policy Center at American University. “At the root of this problem is a lack of information and understanding of tax filing obligations, which is compounded by an information reporting regime that results in widespread confusion. And these tax compliance challenges are only going to continue to grow and impact more and more self-employed small business owners.”

“Everyone is losing under the current rules. Both on-demand economy players and the IRS deserve greater efficiency and less hassle. We can do better,” said Bruckner.

Bruckner is the author of a brand new study released this week titled“Shortchanged: The Tax Compliance Challenges of Small Business Operators Driving the On-Demand Platform Economy.”

“Although millions of Americans are engaging in the on-demand platform economy every day as sellers and service providers, the tax compliance challenges this new frontier presents have gone relatively unnoticed,” Bruckner’s study found. “At the same time, these challenges will grow with this fastest growing segment of the labor economy—creating unnecessary and ongoing burdens for the small business operators who power the on-demand economy.”

“At best, these small business owners are short-changed when filing their taxes; at worst, they fail to file altogether. In addition, these taxpayers face potential audit and penalty exposure for failure to comply with filing rules that are triggered by relatively low amounts of earned income and inconsistent reporting rule adoption,” the study concluded.

IS THERE AN APP FOR THAT?

“Congress and the IRS should take great care to make sure that the federal tax code enables—rather than stifles—the sharing economy,” testified Morgan Reed, the Executive Director of ACT/The App Association. “Specifically, the treatment of all sharing economy workers as 'employees' under the federal tax code would be detrimental to the sharing economy, especially small businesses.”

“Congress should work to advance legislation that would provide taxpayers with certainty and transparency in the tax resolution process and would provide the ability to settle disputes with the IRS in an effective and efficient manner,” Reed suggested.

STAY TUNED

*Today’s hearing was the first in a two-part series on tax compliance for small businesses in the sharing economy. On Thursday, the Committee will hear from the IRS’ National Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olson.

###

Help Wanted: Small Business Providing Opportunities for All

House Small Business Committee News - Thu, 05/19/2016 - 10:00am
Chairman Steve Chabot has scheduled a hearing of the Committee on Small Business titled, “Help Wanted: Small Business Providing Opportunities for All.” The hearing is scheduled to begin at 10:00 A.M. on Thursday, May 19, 2016 in Room 2360 of the Rayburn House Office Building.

Hearing Materials
1. Hearing Notice
2. Witness List

Witness List
Mr. Joe Steffy
Owner
Poppin Joe’s Gourmet Kettle Korn
Louisburg, KS
Accompanied by: Mr. Ray Steffy

Ms. Lisa Goring
Executive Vice President
Programs and Services
Autism Speaks New York, NY

Ms. Terri Hogan
Owner
Contemporary Cabinetry East Cincinnati, OH

Mr. Rajesh Anandan
Co-founder
ULTRA Testing New York, NY

Small Businesses Providing Job Opportunities for All Americans

House Small Business Committee News - Thu, 05/19/2016 - 12:00am

WASHINGTON – Today, entrepreneurs shared their personal stories with the House Small Business Committee about providing employment opportunities for adults with autism, Down syndrome and other intellectual or developmental disorders, syndromes, or disabilities. Witnesses told members of the Committee how these individuals boost morale and productivity in the workplace while raising awareness about the untapped talents and abilities of this often-overlooked community.   

“For adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities or disorders, finding sustaining employment can be a real challenge,” said House Small Business Committee Chairman Steve Chabot (R-OH). “These individuals can be overlooked when employment opportunities arise, and too often they are shut out from the workplace all together.”

“Yet across the country we are seeing examples of how small businesses, with their ability to adapt and accommodate, are able to provide employment opportunities to those who might not otherwise get a chance,” Chabot added.

ONE CINCY SMALL BUSINESS OWNER’S STORY

“We need to educate others so they begin to take the “dis” out of disabilities and replace it with ‘abilities,’ said Terri Hogan, the owner of Contemporary Cabinetry East in Cincinnati, OH, who was accompanied today by Mike Ames, an employee who has Down syndrome. “We also need to make small businesses aware of the huge untapped resource that is people with diverse abilities. Hiring people who are physically, genetically or cognitively diverse is not just the right thing to do, it is the smart thing to do.”

“Mike has raised morale, brought community awareness, caused others to have broader perspectives and has developed many friends at CCE. For the business, Mike has helped to develop a healthier ‘bottom line’; everyone works harder because of the example he sets. Mike has raised everyone’s standards at Contemporary Cabinetry East and hiring Mike was the best business decision I have ever made,” testified Hogan.

“POPPIN’ JOE” SHARES HIS STORY WITH CONGRESS

Joe Steffy, the owner of Poppin Joe’s Gourmet Kettle Korn in Louisburg, KS, shared his personal entrepreneurship story with the Committee.

“In high school, my IEP (Individualized Education Plan) team began to plan for my transition into adulthood. The team had very low expectations. The worst disability there is that of low expectations. They said I would never hold a job, that I had no attention span, could not focus, would need to live in a group home and go to a sheltered workshop. My parents disagreed. They knew I was capable of working and that I learned by watching. They also knew I would do exactly what I saw done, so teaching me the right way to do things would be important. I am happiest when I am busy and my parents knew this. I would work, they said,” recalled Steffy. 

“My business works for me. It creates new opportunities for me to grow as a person, and to be an engaged, valued member of my community. With the right support system, being a self-supporting entrepreneur can be, and is, a reality for me,” he added.

AUTISM SPEAKS: ADVOCATE’S VIEW

“Small businesses are in a position not only to develop new models that employ individuals with autism, but also to innovate in a way that directly responds to local labor market needs,” testified Lisa Goring, the Executive Vice President for Programs and Services at Autism Speaks. “The connection many small businesses have with their community is vital to creating the partnerships necessary to transition young adults into the local workforce, share best practices with other local businesses, and nurture a workforce comprised of people with varying abilities.”

You can read full testimony from today’s witnesses here and watch the full video of today’s hearing here.

Chairman Chabot Statement on House Passage of 55th National Defense Authorization Act

House Small Business Committee News - Thu, 05/19/2016 - 12:00am

WASHINGTON - House Small Business Committee Chairman Steve Chabot (R-OH) made the following statement on House passage of the 55th National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA):

“The contracting reforms included in this year’s NDAA will provide new and improved opportunities for America’s 28 million small businesses to compete for defense contracts so that we can get the best possible products in the hands of our war fighters and make sure the tax payers get the most bang for their buck. I want to thank Chairman Thornberry and the House Armed Services Committee for their work in putting together this year’s NDAA and for including these common sense small business contracting reforms. I look forward to continuing to work with them and our Senate colleagues to get this vital national security bill to the President’s desk post haste.”

Chairman Chabot penned an op-ed for Defense News this week in outlining the key contracting reforms included in this year's NDAA. 

"Job-Killer" : Chairman Chabot Pans DOL’s Final Overtime Rule

House Small Business Committee News - Wed, 05/18/2016 - 12:00am

Says Rule Threatens Success of Small Businesses and their Employees

WASHINGTON - House Small Business Chairman Steve Chabot (R-OH) made the following statement after the Department of Labor announced its final overtime rule, which will hurt small employers and their employees:

“Yet again, President Obama has chosen to ignore desperate pleas from millions of America’s small businesses and whack them with a new regulation that will result in job losses, demotions, less flexibility, lower wages, and reduced benefits for their workers. I find it particularly insulting that the Obama Administration chose to unroll this new spool of job-killing government red tape in my home state of Ohio. Small businesses in our state have been a success story and this new rule threatens that success. America’s small businesses do not want this rule and once again they will be hit worst and first to pay for Obama’s liberal legacy.”

The new rule will increase the salary threshold for federally-mandated overtime requirements for white collar workers by over 100 percent, which means that small businesses with thin margins will be forced to make hard choices – such as shifting salaried workers to hourly status, reducing hiring, and cutting workers hours – to remain economically viable. The harmful effects of the rule will hit small employers and their employees the hardest and DOL plans to update the salary threshold every three years.

The Small Business Committee has vigorously opposed the DOL overtime rule for months. The Committee has held numerous hearings and roundtables and sent multiple letters explaining to the administration the damage that will be done to America’s 28 million small businesses and other small employers as a result of the rule. Chairman Chabot is also co-chairing a special House task force on reducing regulatory burdens.

###

Chairman Chabot in Defense News: Look to US Small Businesses to Supply War Fighters

House Small Business Committee News - Mon, 05/16/2016 - 12:00am
Look to US Small Businesses to Supply War Fighters

By Chairman Steve Chabot (R-OH)
Defense News
May 16, 2016


For 55 years, the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) has been the primary way Congress meets its constitutional responsibility to “provide for the common defense.”

As a vital national security policy bill, the NDAA has always provided our war fighters with the resources they need to defend the United States from the great and varied threats we face from adversaries around the word.

However, in the face of recent drastic defense cuts, known in Washington as “sequestration,” policymakers have had to look for new ways to meet our national security needs.

As chairman of the House Small Business Committee, I firmly believe that our nation’s 28 million small businesses can play a key role in meeting these needs in this era of declining defense resources.

Very often, small companies can provide better products and services to our military, faster and at lower costs.

Congress’ ongoing effort to improve acquisition and modernize procurement at the Pentagon is particularly important to small companies because it will enable them to deliver real benefits to our war fighters.  

At a recent Small Business Committee hearing, we heard from a top official at the Office of Naval Research about two examples of life-saving technology developed by American small businesses that are now used by the US military.

“The Emergency Integrated Lifesaving Lanyard — called EMILY — is a robotic lifeguard deployed worldwide by Hydronalix, a rural Arizona company,” Robert Smith explained to our committee. “The tracking system, reconfigured as the Silver Fox Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV), was deployed in 2007 to provide convoy protection to Marines in Iraq, saving three lives. The same basic technology package, reconfigured as EMILY, is supporting first responders throughout the US and other nations, and saving lives today in the Mediterranean Sea refugee crisis.”

Smith also pointed to Trek Enterprises’ Automated Celestial Navigation (ASN) system as another example of technology developed by a small company now used by the military.

“(ASN) provides a solution in GPS-denied environments through a fully automated star tracker for imaging individual stars both day and night to enhance navigation capability,” Smith testified. “Initially focused on Navy challenges, ASN attracted attention across the government: The result being a fellow agency ordering 15 systems, with applications in crime fighting and drug interdiction."

Success stories like these are a big part of the reason why promoting competition has been the guiding principle for defense acquisition and procurement policy.

We must allow companies of all sizes and expertise to compete for defense contracts in order to get the best possible products to the war fighter.

Contracting reforms such as those included in this year’s NDAA help us achieve this important goal for our military. They also benefit the taxpayers footing the bill, making sure they get more bang for their buck.

You don’t need to be an economist to understand that when the Defense Department has fewer offers, there is less competition, costs go up and choices are limited.

Unfortunately, we continue to see the number of companies competing for federal contracts declining, which threatens innovation and harms readiness.

Within the last three years, we have lost over 25 percent of the small firms registered to do business with the federal government.

Within the Department of Defense, the number of small business contract actions fell 47 percent from 2011, but the size of the average individual small business contract action more than doubled.

Not surprisingly, during the same period, the percentage of taxpayer dollars spent without competition has increased.

With this thought in mind, members of our committee introduced a series of bipartisan contracting bills this year.

Our committee approved these measures unanimously and we are pleased they were incorporated in this year’s NDAA, which was approved by the House Armed Services Committee by a bipartisan vote of 60 to 2 last month.

Specifically, here are five ways this NDAA helps small contractors compete:

First, it modernizes the Small Business Act to ensure clear and consistent language is used in federal procurement programs.

Second, it strengthens the small business advocates within SBA, DoD and other federal agencies, to promote competition and make sure the laws on the books, including the NDAA, are followed.

Third, it improves opportunities for small businesses to compete for subcontracts, and then to build on that experience to compete as prime contractors.

Fourth, it improves coordination between the SBA and DoD mentor-protégé programs, which help small businesses better serve our military.

Finally, this NDAA implements reforms to promote integrity and accountability in small-business programs, such as veterans contracting programs and contracting officer training programs.

This NDAA gives our troops the resources they need to defend the United States while providing meaningful contracting reforms that help our small businesses and our national security.

Rep. Steve Chabot represents Ohio's 1st Congressional District in the U.S. House where he is chairman of the Small Business Committee. He is also a senior member of the Judiciary and Foreign Affairs committees. You can follow him on Twitter @HouseSmallBiz.

The New Faces of American Manufacturing

House Small Business Committee News - Thu, 05/12/2016 - 11:00am
Chairman Steve Chabot has scheduled a hearing of the Committee on Small Business titled, "The New Faces of American Manufacturing." The hearing will beheld on May 12, 2016 at 11:00 AM in Room 2360 of the Rayburn House Office Building. 


Hearing Materials:

Hearing Notice
Witness List

Witness List:

John Ratzenberger
Emmy-nominated actor and Made in America advocate

Dustin Tillman
President & CEO
Elite Aviation Products

Dr. Ray Perren
President
Lanier Technical College

Kim Glas
Executive Director
BlueGreen Alliance


Small Business Committee Hearing to Feature Cincinnati Job Creator

House Small Business Committee News - Thu, 05/12/2016 - 12:00am

WASHINGTON—House Small Business Committee Chairman Steve Chabot (R-Ohio) today announced that next week’s full committee hearing, which will focus on small businesses that provide employment opportunities for adults with intellectual or developmental disorders, syndromes, or disabilities, will feature a local Cincinnati business owner.

Terri Hogan, owner of Contemporary Cabinetry East in Cincinnati, will share her story about how her company came to provide employment opportunities for individuals with special needs.

We talk a lot about how small businesses are the biggest job creators in America,” said Chairman Chabot. “Even more inspiring are the opportunities they provide for people who too often get overlooked despite the enormous contributions they can make to the workforce. Terri Hogan’s story is a wonderful example of how small businesses can partner with individuals who face more adversity than most, and how those businesses and their employees can thrive from that relationship.”

In addition to Ms. Hogan, the Committee will hear from Joe Steffy, owner of Poppin Joe’s Gourmet Kettle Korn in Louisburg, Kansas, Lisa Goring of Autism Speaks, and Rajesh Anandan of ULTRA Testing in New York.

The hearing will stream live at smallbusiness.house.gov at 10:00 AM on Thursday, May 19.  

###

Cheers to Making it in the U.S.A

House Small Business Committee News - Thu, 05/12/2016 - 12:00am

John Ratzenberger Pitches American Manufacturing to Congress

WASHINGTON – Emmy-nominated actor and “Made in America” advocate John Ratzenberger told members of the House Small Business Committee that the face of American manufacturing has changed dramatically in recent years, presenting new job opportunities for millions of Americans. Ratzenberger, best known as Cliff Clavin from the sitcom Cheers and the voice of Hamm from Pixar’s Toy Story movies, testified alongside a panel of small manufacturers and experts about the importance of vocational training to close the manufacturing skills gap.

“When people think of manufacturers, too often they think of giant corporations with huge production facilities and steam whistles commanding shift changes,” said House Small Business Committee Chairman Steve Chabot (R-OH). “The truth is that the vast majority of American manufacturing is done by small businesses. In fact, 99 percent of all manufacturers are categorized as small. Though they might be considered “small” businesses, their effect on our economy is enormous.”

“We must do better job educating young people to improve the perception of what manufacturing really is and getting the word out that manufacturing is “clean and safe” and “high-tech” rather than “dirty and dangerous,” added Chairman Chabot.

Chabot noted that manufacturers in the United States employ over 12 million people and directly contribute over $2 trillion to our economy each year.

The New Face of American Manufacturing

“There are close to a million jobs available right now in small businesses around the country that rely on people with mechanical common sense skills that we've stopped offering in our public schools three generations ago,” testified Mr. Ratzenberger. “The most repeated complaint today from potential employers is that it's impossible to train someone for any of the jobs available when they graduate from high schools everywhere without the ability to even read inches and fractions from a simple ruler.”

“Manufacturing is the backbone of Western Civilization. Everything we do every single day is reliant first on someone's ability to not only put a nut and a bolt together but to make that nut and that bolt in the first place,” observed Mr. Ratzenberger. “The big worrisome question then is this: How do we reinstate the necessary programs in our schools to give our children a familiarity of the tools that built and maintain our civilization and way of life? If the average age of the people that keep our nation and the nation’s infrastructure working is 58 years old, then how long do we have before it all stops?”

One American Manufacturer’s Story

“As a nation we also need to do a better job of accurately characterizing the multi-faceted and exciting careers that exist within manufacturing,” said Dustin Tillman, the President and CEO of Elite Aviation Products. Despite our talent as a culture for crafting topnotch media, we do a poor job at shining a spot light on the exciting and fulfilling career paths that exist within modern manufacturing; full of all the intricate and challenging dynamics that would enthrall and captivate the young workforce entering the job market.”

“For us, and many other businesses out there, the best pool of talent that I’ve been exposed to have been veterans. These highly trained individuals who possess key characteristics for success in business, e.g., honor, integrity, discipline, and leadership are right in our own backyards, and, from what I’ve seen, eager to get to work,” added  Tillman whose company founded the Elite Veterans Initiative Elite to support, empower, and employ veterans.

The Role of Education

“Today’s manufacturing environment requires highly skilled individuals who not only understand complex technological applications but also are adept at problem solving,” testified Dr. Ray Perren, the President of Lanier Technical College in Oakwood, Georgia. “Although the face of manufacturing is changing, too often the perception of manufacturing has not changed. Too often, people think of manufacturing jobs as being physically repetitive work, carried out in dirty environments, with little or no ability to utilize critical thinking to improve job performance. Nothing could be further from the truth.”

You can read all the witness testimony from today’s hearing here and view the full video of today’s hearing here.

Inspiring Entrepreneurs: Learning from the Experts

House Small Business Committee News - Wed, 05/11/2016 - 12:00am

Lawmakers Hear from Popular Small Biz Experts

WASHINGTON – Today a panel of well-known entrepreneurs shared their personal stories with Members of Congress about what it takes to start a successful small business and what Washington can do to help aspiring entrepreneurs start, grow and expand their business. Coming days after National Small Business Week, the experts and members of the House Small Business Committee had a spirited discussion on the best ways Washington can empower entrepreneurs. Simplifying the tax code, rolling back unnecessary regulations and improving small business education outreach were key topics of discussion.   

“At the very heart of small business‒ what allows them to succeed‒ are the people; the men and women of this country who set out with an idea and the desire to turn that idea into a reality,” observed House Small Business Committee Steve Chabot (R-OH). “It is this enduring spirit of American innovation that continues to breathe life into our economy and create the jobs no government program can.”

“Each of our witnesses has taken the lessons learned from building their own businesses, and provide guidance to small business owners and aspiring entrepreneurs. The difference between a good idea and a good business is execution, and who do America’s small businesses turn to for help developing and executing a business plan? They turn to JJ Ramberg, to Ramon Ray, to Susan Solovic, and to Melinda Emerson. And so today, so do we,” said Chairman Chabot in kicking off today’ hearing.  

THE EXPERTS WEIGH IN

Let’s think about the husband and wife who start a business together, or a high school graduate working on an invention, or that laid off 50 year-old forced to begin their own business,” said Ramon Ray, the Editor of Smart Hustle Magazine. “The best thing our government can do for small business owners, is to have limited regulation, lower and simplified taxes and continue to invest in the education of small business owners at the local, state and Federal level.”

“Both on and off Main Street, we have heard a common refrain: difficulty finding affordable funding to expand, a challenge around recruiting top notch employees and a sense of loneliness and lack of community to help with business issues,” testified JJ Ramberg, an entrepreneur and the host of MSNBC’s Your Business. “That said, I believe we are in the beginning of a sweeping change when it comes to small business. Companies in the fintech and edtech space are working to address the issues of financing business and educating our workforce.”

“With millennials now making up the largest share of the American workforce and primed to take over an increasing share of small business ownership, much will continue to change when it comes to entrepeneurship,” added Ramberg.

“The regulatory burden in this country is in the trillions of dollars and small businesses pay 36 percent more than larger enterprises,” noted Susan Solovic, THE Small Business Expert and an advocate. “Could small businesses in the U.S. eventually become extinct? In my opinion, if we continue down this path of hyper-regulation, they will certainly become an endangered species. How can we protect this important market sector? As one long-time entrepreneur said to me when I asked what needs to be done: Get out of our business.”

“There are other regulatory challenges that small businesses face that should be reviewed,” said Melinda Emerson, the founder & CEO of Quintessence Group and the Melinda F. Emerson Foundation. “The expanded categorization of who can and cannot be considered a 1099 independent contractor is a challenge for small businesses and the cost of full-time employees is prohibitive to cash-strapped start-ups. The tax code needs to be simplified to help more small business owners; it costs a lot to be in business in the U.S.”

You can read all of the witness testimony here and view full video of today’s hearing here.

BACKGROUND:

Last week, the Small Business Committee celebrated National Small Business Week:

  • Chairman Chabot delivered the Weekly Republican Address outlining the ways the Committee is working to empower America’s 28 million small businesses.
  • Chabot penned an op-ed for The Washington Examiner on the importance of small businesses to the U.S. economy and the men and women who work to make them succeed.  
  • Chabot also stopped by “Mornings with Maria” on Fox Business Network to kick off National Small Business Week with host Maria Bartiromo.
  • Chabot, Ranking Member Nydia Velázquez and Committee members introduced a bipartisan House resolution recognizing the economic contribution of America’s small businesses.  

  • From Main Street to Silicon Valley, the Committee told the story of how America’s small businesses and innovators are changing the way our economy works on Medium. You can read their stories here.

Chairman Chabot in Washington Examiner: Every Small Business Started As An Idea

House Small Business Committee News - Fri, 05/06/2016 - 12:00am


Every Small Business Started As An Idea
By Chairman Steve Chabot (R-OH)
May 6, 2016

Every small business started as an idea.

Each year, National Small Business Week gives us the perfect opportunity to celebrate the invaluable contribution America’s small businesses make to our economy and the ideas that made them possible.

It is also an opportunity for Washington to refocus its efforts to help them thrive so they can do what they do best: create jobs and help grow our economy.

As our Committee noted in a bipartisan House resolution we introduced recognizing this week as National Small Business Week, the most recent statistics show there is nothing “small” about small business in America.

For instance, many people are surprised to learn that 99.7 percent of businesses with employees are small businesses and that 98 percent of American exporters are small businesses.

Sixty three percent of new jobs created are by small businesses and 46 percent of private sector output is produced by these engines of economic growth.

This huge economic footprint means that nearly everything Washington does - from taxes to regulations to health care to international trade - affects millions of families because they impact our small businesses.

As Chairman of the House Small Business Committee, I hear from small business owners from across the country about how they feel hamstrung by excessive regulation and complicated taxes.

This Congress, we’ve made some meaningful progress by easing some of these burdens that will help our small businesses prosper.

We’ve begun the hard work of getting the tax code to work for small businesses instead of against them. Specifically, we have made both the research and development tax credit and Section 179 expensing permanent. We also expanded bonus depreciation through 2019.

To help lower energy costs for small businesses and individuals, we also ended the decades-old ban on crude oil exports. We have also opened new doors for economic development by strengthening local Certified Development Companies (CDCs) and the Small Business Investment Company (SBIC) program.

To honor our American heroes and encourage veteran entrepreneurship, we waived upfront 7(a) loan fees for veterans and their spouses who want to start a small business. This bipartisan law helps veterans build on the leadership skills they have learned while serving our country which translates well into success as entrepreneurs.

We’ve also passed The Helping Angels Lead Our Startups (HALOS) Act, to help startup companies access early capital through “angel investors” by a vote of 325 to 89.  

When entrepreneurs look for ways to get their business off the ground and keep it off the ground, they look at every avenue available to them. I firmly believe that Congress must take the same approach as we look for new ways to help them succeed.

There is no effort too big or too small when it comes to empowering America’s entrepreneurs. Their efforts exemplify the American dream each and every day. 

As Walt Disney, himself a great entrepreneur, once remarked, “If you can dream it, you can do it.”

We must do all we can to encourage America’s innovators who dare to dream and put their shoulders to the wheel to turn those dreams into realities.

I urge all Americans to support their local small businesses this #SmallBizWeek2016. 

Congressman Steve Chabot represents Ohio's First Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives where he is chairman of the House Committee on Small Business. He is also a senior member of the Committee on the Judiciary and the Committee on Foreign Affairs. You can follow the committee on Twitter @HouseSmallBiz.

Small Business Committee Chairman Steve Chabot to Deliver Weekly Republican Address

House Small Business Committee News - Fri, 05/06/2016 - 12:00am

From the Office of the Speaker:

Small Business Committee Chairman Steve Chabot to Deliver Weekly Republican Address

WASHINGTON — Marking National Small Business Week, House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) announced today that House Small Business Committee Chairman Steve Chabot (R-OH) will deliver the Weekly Republican Address on Saturday, May 7. In the address, Chairman Chabot will discuss how House Republicans are working to relieve small businesses of excessive regulations and complicated taxes imposed under the current tax system.

Small business owners, employees, and entrepreneurs everywhere should be energized by our reform agenda for the future,” said Chairman Chabot. “I’m excited to deliver this address to discuss the bold new ideas House Republicans are bringing to the table that will challenge the way Washington does business for years to come.”

“Small businesses are the backbone of the American economy,” Speaker Ryan said in an op-ed for the The Journal Times. “Right now, the deck is stacked against our workers and small businesses. Let’s lower their tax rates, level the playing field, and watch our small businesses thrive.”

Chairman Steve Chabot has proudly served on the House Small Business Committee since first being elected to Congress in 1994. During his time in Congress, he has made small business growth and job creation a top priority. Chairman Chabot served as ranking member on the Small Business Committee from 2007-2008. During the 113th Congress, he also served as chairman of the Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific, where he focused on opening new markets and expanding trade opportunities for American businesses.

Learn more about Chairman Chabot by following him on Twitter, liking his Facebook page, or visiting his website. Learn more about the House Small Business Committee by following it on Twitter, liking its Facebook page, or visiting its website.

NOTE: The Weekly Republican Address will be available starting Saturday, May 7, at 6:00 a.m. ET on speaker.gov.

- See more at: http://www.speaker.gov/press-release/small-business-committee-chairman-steve-chabot-deliver-weekly-republican-address#sthash.8JHB7Rm7.dpuf

Chairman Chabot Kicks Off National Small Business Week with Fox Business Network's Maria Bartiromo

House Small Business Committee News - Mon, 05/02/2016 - 12:00am
CINCINNATI - House Small Business Committee Chairman Steve Chabot (R-OH) stopped by Fox Business Network's "Mornings with Maria" today to discuss National Small Business Week and the work the Committee is doing to reduce the tax and regulatory burden on America's 28 million small businesses.

Send It Back: Small Biz Committee Urges OMB to Reject Harmful DOL Overtime Rule

House Small Business Committee News - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 12:00am

Send It Back: Small Biz Committee Urges OMB to Reject Harmful DOL Overtime Rule

WASHINGTON – House Small Business Committee Chairman Steve Chabot (R-OH) and Republican Committee Members today urged the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to reject a new Department of Labor (DOL) rule that will destroy jobs, lower wages, and reduce benefits for the millions of Americans who work for small businesses and other small employers.

In a letter to Howard Shelanski, the Administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) at OMB, Committee members cited significant problems with adequacy and accuracy of DOL’s analysis of the impacts of the new “overtime rule” and concerns they have heard from small businesses about the harm DOL’s one-size-fits-all rule will do to them and their employees.

OIRA has the authority to return a draft final rule to DOL for reconsideration if DOL’s analysis is inadequate or the rule is inconsistent with Executive Order 12,866 or statutes. In their letter, the Committee members urged them to use this authority to help small employers.

Chabot, who is also co-chairing House Speaker Paul Ryan’s task force on reducing regulatory burdens, has pushed back hard against the overtime rule. The Committee has held numerous hearings and roundtables and sent multiple letters explaining to the Obama administration the damage that will be done to America’s 28 million small businesses as a result of the overtime rule.

You can view the signed letter HERE.

Full text of the letter below.

April 28, 2016

The Honorable Howard Shelanski
Administrator
Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs
Office of Management and Budget
725 17th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20503

Dear Administrator Shelanski:

We are writing to urge the Office of Management and Budget’s Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) to return the rule revising the existing Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA or Act)regulations that implement the exemption from minimum wage and overtime pay for executive, administrative, professional, outside sales or computer employees (the “overtime rule”) to the Wage and Hour Division of the Department of Labor (DOL) for reconsideration. The DOL received nearly 300,000 comments on the proposed overtime rule, many of which describe the profound negative consequences for American workers and small employers. In addition, serious concerns have been raised about the adequacy and accuracy of DOL’s analysis of the overtime rule’s impacts on small employers.

When promulgating regulations, the DOL must comply with the Regulatory Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. §§ 601-12 (RFA), Executive Order (E.O.) 12,866,and President Obama’s Memorandum on Regulatory Flexibility, Small Business, and Job Creation (President’s Memorandum). The RFA requires the DOL to determine whether a proposed rule will have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small businesses. If DOL determines that the proposed rule will have the aforementioned impact, it must perform an initial regulatory flexibility analysis (IRFA) that describes the impact of the proposed rule on small businesses, small non-profits, and small governmental jurisdiction and any significant alternatives that would minimize any significant economic impact on them. A similar assessment, a final regulatory flexibility analysis, is required at the final rule stage. Simply stated, these analyses require DOL to take the commonsense steps of assessing the effects of the rule on small employers and evaluating options to reduce significant economic impacts.

The DOL also must comply with E.O. 12,866 and the President’s Memorandum. E.O. 12,866 requires the DOL to assess the costs and benefits of the regulation, including the “costs and benefits of potentially effective and reasonably feasible alternatives to the planned regulation.” Furthermore, it requires DOL to “design its regulations in the most cost-effective manner to achieve the regulatory objective” and “tailor its regulations to impose the least burden on society, including individuals, businesses of differing sizes, and other entities (including small communities and governmental entities).”The President reiterated that point in his Memorandum issued on January 21, 2011 directing agencies to “give serious consideration to whether and how it is appropriate . . . to reduce regulatory burdens on small businesses, through increased flexibility.”

Unfortunately, DOL has not fully met its obligations under the aforementioned statute and presidential directives, and the negative ramifications will be felt most acutely by small employers and their employees. While the DOL correctly determined that the overtime rule will have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small employers and performed an IRFA, the analysis has serious flaws. Furthermore, the overtime rule is poised to cause significant disruptions in American workplaces that are likely to harm small employers and their employees.

The Chief Counsel for Advocacy at the Small Business Administration sent a comment letter to DOL that described serious problems with its analysis of the overtime rule’s impacts on small employers. DOL relied on numerous unsupported assumptions that obscure the number of affected small businesses, did not examine the effects on different types of small businesses by industry sub-sectors, regions, and revenue sizes, did not assess the effects on small governmental jurisdictions or small non-profits, significantly underestimated the compliance costs, did not account for non-financial effects, and failed to consider alternatives that would reduce impacts on small employers. The Chief Counsel for Advocacy recommended that DOL published a supplemental IRFA to reanalyze the impacts on small employers.

The concerns with DOL’s analysis and the overtime rule’s effects on small employers were echoed by three small businesses – a restaurant owner, a home builder, and a retail store owner – that testified before the Committee on Small Business Subcommittee on Investigations, Oversight and Regulations last October. Small employers, particularly those in rural areas, will be unable to increase their workers’ salaries to the proposed salary threshold, which will increase 113 percent under the overtime rule, and remain economically viable. As a result, small employers will have no choice but to move salaried workers to hourly status, reduce hours, and trim benefits, which will hurt their employees.

Serious concerns have been raised about the negative repercussions for small employers and their employees. Moreover, the rule must be adequately assessed, as required by the RFA, so that the true consequences of the overtime rule are understood and considered before the DOL proceeds. Thus, we respectfully request that OIRA return the draft final rule to the DOL for reconsideration.

####

S is for Savings: Pro-Growth Benefits of Employee-Owned S Corporations

House Small Business Committee News - Wed, 04/27/2016 - 11:00am
Chairman Steve Chabot has scheduled a hearing of the Committee on Small Business titled, “S is for Savings:  Pro-Growth Benefits of Employee-Owned S Corporations.” The hearing is scheduled to begin at 11:00 A.M. on Wednesday, April 27, 2016 in Room 2360 of the Rayburn House Office Building.  

Hearing Materials
1. Hearing Notice
2. Witness List

Copyright

© 2016 Women Construction Owners & Executives USA
WCOE grows your contacts, contracts & bottom line