Construction Industry News

Fishery Failures: Improving the Disaster Declaration and Relief Process

U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., chairman of the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, will convene a hearing titled, “Fishery Failures: Improving the Disaster Declaration and Relief Process,” at 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, September 25, 2019. This hearing will examine federal and stakeholder perspectives on the fishery disaster process and how those disasters impact local communities. The hearing will also examine recent and pending disaster declarations and how the process for both declaration and relief could be improved.

Improving Air Traffic Control for the American People: Examining the Current System

U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, chairman of the Subcommittee on Aviation and Space, will convene a hearing titled, “Improving Air Traffic Control for the American People: Examining the Current System,” at 2:30 p.m. on Tuesday, September 24, 2019. The hearing will examine the current state of the United States’ air traffic control (ATC) system. Witnesses will discuss challenges and highlight possible improvements to the efficiency and safety of the ATC system.

Wicker Emphasizes Importance of Public Awareness Campaigns for REAL ID

WASHINGTON – U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, this week sent letters to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Transportation Security Administration (TSA) requesting information on their efforts to ensure the public is aware of an impending change to the law that will require air travelers to have REAL ID compliant identification.

“Beginning October 1, 2020, every air traveler 18 years of age and older will need a REAL ID-compliant driver’s license (or other acceptable form of ID) to fly within the United States,” writes Wicker. “I am increasingly concerned about the potential disruption for air travel if there is widespread lack of compliance with the law among the flying public. DHS’s efforts will play a crucial role in ensuring that the public is aware and takes the necessary steps to acquire compliant identification.”

The full letter to DHS and TSA specifically requests information about steps being taken to inform the traveling public about the REAL ID compliance deadline, ways DHS is engaging aviation and travel industry stakeholders, actions DHS is taking to work with relevant state licensing officials, and the department’s contingency plans for potential disruptions to air travel after the October 1 deadline. Last week the committee held a TSA oversight hearing. During that hearing, the topic of REAL ID compliance was discussed in detail with Acting Deputy Administrator Patricia Cogswell.

In addition to the letter to DHS, the chairman sent letters to various travel industry stakeholders urging them to engage with DHS and TSA and to amplify the agencies’ message about ways to acquire a REAL ID-compliant identification card and the upcoming deadline.

Click here for the letter to DHS and TSA.

Click here for the letters to the Travel Technology Association, U.S. Travel Association, Airlines for America, and Global Business Travel Association.

As Hate Crimes Surge, Cantwell Pushes Facebook, Google, Twitter on Actions to Counter Rise in Extremism

TV-Quality Video |YouTube | Audio 

Hearing comes a day after Cantwell joined colleagues on the Senate floor to call for expanded federal background checks, extreme risk protection orders 

Between 2013 and 2017, Senator Cantwell’s home state of Washington saw a 78 percent rise in hate crimes; state has third-highest rate of hate crimes per capita in the United States 

In 2017, 510 hate crimes were reported statewide – a 32 percent increase 

WASHINGTON, DC – As the United States continues to experience a surge in hate crimes and extremism throughout the country, U.S. Senator Maria Cantwell (D-WA), the Ranking Member of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, pushed representatives from Facebook, Google, and Twitter on what their companies are doing to push back against hate on their platforms.

“Across the country, we are seeing and experiencing a surge of hate and as a result we need to think much harder about the tools and resources we need to combat this problem both online and offline,” Senator Cantwell said. “I do want us to think about ways in which we can all work together to address these issues. I feel that working together, these are successful tools that we can deploy in trying to fight extremism that exists online.”

In addition to what more social media platforms can do to counter extremism and hate on their platforms, Cantwell also asked witnesses about incitement happening on the “dark web” and through websites that publish hate, like 8chan.

“What do you think we need to do to monitor incitement on dark websites?” Cantwell asked George Selim, the Senior Vice President of Programs at the Anti-Defamation League.

“A number of measures,” Mr. Selim replied. “The first is having our public policy be starting from a place where we’re victim-focused… We really need to start from a place that prevents and has a better accounting of hate crimes, bias motived crimes, hate-related incidents, etcetera. And when we start from that place, I think we can make better policy and better programs at the federal government and state and local and also in the private industry levels as well.”

In response, Cantwell announced that she will be calling on the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) to bolster its efforts against extremism, hatred, and violence on the internet and called on the companies testifying before the committee to join in these efforts, as well as to prevent people supporting hate and terror from moving from social media platforms to the dark web.

“I’m definitely going to be calling on the Department of Justice to ask what more we can do in this coordination,” Cantwell said. “Several years ago, Microsoft worked with [law enforcement] and others on trying to address, on an international basis, child pornography to better skill law enforcement at policing crime scenes online. And I would assume that the representatives today would be supportive, maybe helpful – maybe even financially helpful – in trying to address these crimes as they exist today as hate crimes on the dark side of the web.”

As Congress continues to consider responses to rising hatred and violence, Senator Cantwell joined a group of her colleagues on the Senate floor yesterday to call for a vote on expanded background checks legislation. At today’s hearing, Cantwell also commended a group of 145 companies for a letter last week expressing support for gun safety legislation.

“I do appreciate, just last week representatives from various companies of all sizes in the tech industry sending the Senate a letter, asking for passage of bills requiring extensive background checks,” Senator Cantwell said. “So very much appreciate that and your support of laws to keep guns out of the hands of people who a court has determined are dangerous.”

Senator Cantwell has taken a leadership role in the Senate in countering hate and hate crimes. In April 2017, she led a group of colleagues in sending a letter to President Trump calling for the establishment of a Presidential Task Force to address the alarming rise of hate crimes across many communities in the United States. She continued that push after white supremacist violence in Charlottesville later that year. That letter led the DOJ to form a Hate Crimes Subcommittee as part of the Task Force on Crime Reduction and Public Safety to combat hate crimes, which was later transformed into a freestanding, Department-wide Hate Crimes Enforcement and Prevention Initiative, led by the Civil Rights Division.

Video from Senator Cantwell’s opening statement is available HERE, and audio is available HERE.

Video from Senator Cantwell’s witness Q&A is available HERE, and audio is available HERE.

###

 

 

Committee Announces Hearing on Fishery Disasters

U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., chairman of the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, will convene a hearing titled, “Fishery Failures: Improving the Disaster Declaration and Relief Process,” at 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, September 25, 2019. This hearing will examine federal and stakeholder perspectives on the fishery disaster process and how those disasters impact local communities. The hearing will also examine recent and pending disaster declarations and how the process for both declaration and relief could be improved.

<p align="center"><b>Senator Maria

Senator Maria Cantwell 

Opening Statement at Commerce Committee, Science, & Transportation Hearing on Mass Violence, Extremism, and Digital Responsibility 

Witness: Ms. Monika Bickert, Head of Global Policy Management, Facebook;

Mr. Nick Pickles, Public Policy Director, Twitter;

Mr. George Selim, Senior Vice President of Programs, Anti-Defamation League;

Mr. Derek Slater, Global Director of Information Policy, Google 

September 18, 2019

CANTWELL: Thank you Mr. Chairman and thank you for holding this important hearing and for our witnesses being here this morning.

Across the country, we are seeing and experiencing a surge of hate and as a result we need to think much harder about the tools and resources we need to combat this problem both online and offline. While the First Amendment to the Constitution protects free speech, speech that incites eminent violence is not protected and Congress should review and strengthen laws that prohibit threats of violence, harassment, stalking, and intimidation to make sure that we stop the online behavior that does incite violence.

In testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee in July, Federal Bureau of Investigation FBI Director Chris Wray said that the white supremacist violence is on the rise. He said the FBI takes this threat “extremely seriously” and has made over 100 arrests so far this year.

We’re seeing in my state over the last several years. We’ve suffered a shooting at the Jewish community center in Seattle, a shooting of a Sikh in Kent, Washington, a bombing attempt at the MLK Day parade in Spokane, and over the last year, we’ve seen a rise in the desecration of both synagogues and mosques. The rise in hate across the country has also led to multiple mass shootings, including the Tree of Life congregation in Pittsburgh, the Pulse nightclub in Orlando and most recently, the Walmart in El Paso.

Social media is used to amplify that hate and the shooter at one high school in the Parkland posting said the image of himself with guns and knives on Instagram wrote social media posts prior to the attack on his fellow students. In El Paso, the killer published a white supremacist anti-immigration manifesto on 8chan message board, and my colleague just mentioned this streaming of live content related to the Christchurch shooting, the horrific incidents that happened there. In Miramar, the military engaged in a systematic engagement of Facebook, using fake names and sham accounts to promote violence against Muslim Rohingya. These human lives were all cut short by deep hatred and extremism that we have seen has become more common.

This is a particular problem on the dark web, where we see certain websites like 8chan and a host of 24/7, 365 hate rallies.  Adding technology tools to mainstream websites to stop the spread of these dark websites is a start, but there needs to be more to be a concentrated and coordinated effort to ensure that people are not directed into these cesspools. I believe calling on the Department of Justice to make sure that we are working across the board on an international basis with companies as well to fight this issue is an important thing to be done. We don’t want to push people off of social media platforms only to then being on the dark web, where we are finding less of them. We need to do more, the Department of Justice, to shut down these dark web sites and social media companies need to work with us to make sure that we are doing this.

I do want to mention, just last week, as there’s much discussion here in Washington, about initiatives. The state of Washington has passed three initiatives, gun initiatives, by the vote of the people, closing background loopholes and also relating to private sales and extreme person laws, all voted on by a majority of people in our state and have successfully passed. So I do appreciate, just last week representatives from various companies of all sizes in the tech industry sending the Senate a letter, asking for passage of bills requiring extensive background checks. So very much appreciate that and your support of extreme person laws to keep guns out of the hands of people who a court has determined are dangerous in the possession of that.

So this morning, we look forward to asking you about ways in which we can better fight these issues. I do want us to think about ways in which we can all work together to address these issues. I feel that working together, these are successful tools that we can deploy in trying to fight extremism that exists online.

Thank you Mr. Chairman for the hearing.

<p>Over the past two decades, the

Over the past two decades, the United States has led the world in the development of social media and other services that allow people to connect with one another. Open platform providers like Google, Twitter, and Facebook and products like Instagram and YouTube have dramatically changed the way we communicate and have been used positively in providing spaces for like-minded groups to come together and in shedding light on despotic regimes and abuses of power throughout the world. No matter how great the benefits to society these platforms provide, it is important to consider how they can be used for evil at home and abroad.

On August 3, 2019, twenty people were killed and more than two dozen were injured in a mass shooting at an El Paso shopping center. Police have said that they are “reasonably confident” that the suspect posted a manifesto to a website called “8chan” 27 minutes prior to the shooting. 8chan moderators removed the original post, though users continued sharing copies. Following the shooting, President Trump called on social media companies to work in partnership with local, state, and federal agencies to develop tools that can detect mass shooters before they strike – I certainly hope we talk about that challenge today.

Sadly, the El Paso shooting is not the only recent example of mass violence with an online dimension. On March 15, 2019, 51 people were killed and 49 were injured in shootings at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand. The perpetrator filmed the attacks using a body camera and live-streamed the footage to his Facebook followers, who began to re-upload the footage to Facebook and other sites. Access to the footage quickly spread, and Facebook stated that it removed 1.5 million videos of the massacre within 24 hours of the attack. 1.2 million views of the videos were blocked before they could be uploaded. Like the El Paso shooter, the Christchurch shooter also uploaded a manifesto to 8chan.

The 2016 shooting at the Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, Florida, killed 49 and injured 53 more. The Orlando shooter was reportedly radicalized by ISIS and other jihadist propaganda through online sources. Days after the attack, the FBI Director stated that investigators were “highly confident” that the shooter was self-radicalized through the internet. According to an official involved in the investigation, analysis of the shooter’s electronic devices revealed that he had “consumed a hell of a lot of jihadist propaganda,” including ISIS beheading videos. Shooting survivors and family members of victims brought a federal lawsuit against those three social media platforms under the Anti-Terrorism Act. The Sixth Circuit dismissed the lawsuit on the grounds that this was not an “act of international terrorism.”

With over 3.2 billion internet users, this Committee recognizes the challenge facing social media companies and online platforms’ their ability to act and remove content threatening violence from their sites. There are questions about tracking of a user’s online activity, does this invade an individual’s privacy, thwart due process, or violate constitutional rights. The automatic removal of threatening content may also impact an online platform’s ability to detect possible warning signs. Indeed, the First Amendment offers strong protections against restricting certain speech, this undeniably adds to the complexity of our task.

I hope these witnesses will speak to these challenges and how their companies are navigating these challenges.

In today’s internet-connected society, misinformation, fake news, deepfakes, and viral online conspiracy theories have become the norm.  This hearing is an opportunity for witnesses to discuss how their platforms go about identifying content and material that threatens violence and poses a real and potentially immediate danger to the public. I hope our witnesses will also discuss how their content moderation processes work.  This includes addressing how human review or technological tools are employed to remove or otherwise limit violent content before it is posted, copied, and disseminated across the internet.

Communication with law enforcement officials at the federal, state, and local levels is critical to protecting our neighborhoods and communities. We would like to know how companies are coordinating with law enforcement when violent or extremist content is identified. And finally, I hope witnesses will discuss how Congress can assist ongoing efforts to remove content promoting violence from online platforms and whether best practices or industry codes of conduct in this area would help increase safety both online and offline.

So, I look forward to hearing testimonies from our witnesses, and hope we engage in a constructive discussion about potential solutions to a pressing issue.

Mass Violence, Extremism, and Digital Responsibility

U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., chairman of the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, will convene a hearing titled, “Mass Violence, Extremism, and Digital Responsibility,” at 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, September 18, 2019. In light of recent incidents of mass violence, this hearing will examine the proliferation of extremism online and explore the effectiveness of industry efforts to remove violent content from online platforms. Witnesses will discuss how technology companies are working with law enforcement when violent or threatening content is identified and the processes for removal of such content.

Subcommittee to Hold Hearing on Air Traffic Control System

U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, chairman of the Subcommittee on Aviation and Space, will convene a hearing titled, “Improving Air Traffic Control for the American People: Examining the Current System,” at 2:30 p.m. on Tuesday, September 24, 2019. The hearing will examine the current state of the United States’ air traffic control (ATC) system. Witnesses will discuss challenges and highlight possible improvements to the efficiency and safety of the ATC system.

Cantwell Presses TSA on Sea-Tac Staffing, Security Measures

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, U.S. Senator Maria Cantwell (D-WA), the Ranking Member of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, pressed Patricia Cogswell, the Acting Deputy Administrator of the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), on staffing levels and security measures at Sea-Tac Airport.

“As one of the fastest growing airports, if not the fastest growing airport in the nation, the challenges of moving people and making sure that we’re all secure is a very, very important daily task,” Senator Cantwell said.

In her questions for Acting Deputy Administrator Cogswell, Cantwell asked about ongoing efforts to train additional teams to handle the growth in passenger traffic at Sea-Tac.

“I mentioned Sea-Tac and its rapid growth – I think we’re at 135,000 people a day and almost 50 million a year. I noticed that the site for Sea-Tac says it was built in 1949 to accommodate a million people, so the fact that we’re accommodating annually 50 million people shows the stress and strain on the system,” Senator Cantwell said.

“These security measures are of the utmost importance to us in continuing to do a good job at the security layer, as well as moving in a cost-effective fashion,” Cantwell continued. “I wanted to ask you about the new rules for developing third party canine units for explosive detection. When will we see those, and what other initiatives are we pursuing to have fully-trained teams available for deployment?”

Cogswell answered that TSA is continuing its work to address passenger and cargo screening needs.

“We expect to see continued growth and volume in that space; we’ve had a lot of interest in it,” Cogswell said. “In addition to the aspect around the third-party canine, we are also looking at the next round, next review, next enhancement, of technology that could be available for use in screening of cargo.”

“So, it’s safe to say that Sea-Tac will be seeing aggressive use of canines and that TSA will be continuing its own efforts as well as whatever Sea-Tac does on its own,” Cantwell concluded.

Senator Cantwell has long been a leader on aviation security issues in Congress. She authored legislation to help bring more bomb-sniffing dogs, which improve security and decrease passenger wait times, to airports across the country. Cantwell has also worked with TSA to deploy new dogs to Sea-Tac Airport to improve security checkpoint wait times at the airport. She has also worked with her colleagues to oppose cuts proposed by the Trump administration for Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response (VIPR) teams, a critical mass transit security program.

Video of Senator Cantwell’s opening statement is available HERE, and audio is available HERE.

Video of Senator Cantwell’s Q&A is available HERE, and audio is available HERE.

###

Opening Statement

Senator Maria Cantwell 

Opening Statement at Commerce Committee, Science, & Transportation Hearing on Oversight of the Transportation Security Administration 

Witness: Patricia Cogswell, Acting Deputy Administrator, Transportation Security Administration 

September 11, 2019

CANTWELL: Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and let me also welcome Acting Deputy Administrator Cogswell for joining us this morning. And thank you for all the work that TSA does in keeping us safe every day.

On this somber date, we remember the tragic and devastating events of 18 years ago. An adversary motivated by nothing short of an evil attack on our nation and the horrifying grief and loss of life was unimaginable. Establishing the Transportation Security Administration was among several steps that Congress took to ensure the attack would never be repeated. In the last Congress, this committee worked hard to complete the work on the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018, also including the first comprehensive reauthorization of TSA since the agency was created shortly after the September 11 attacks. Our focus today is on oversight of the agency as it continues its critical mission and seeks to implement the mandates included in last year’s TSA authorization, formerly known as the TSA Modernization Act.

As you know, last year’s TSA Modernization Act focused on improving transportation security by addressing such issues as training and deployment of canines for screening of passengers and cargo, reinforcing efforts the intercept insider threats, and expediting testing and deployment of new screening technologies in various organizations to ensure the effective leadership at the agency. I also want to note here I appreciate the good work of the Pacific Northwest Laboratories in Richland, Washington, who, at airports with the Millimeter Wave Scan, have worked through security and developing, we call it the TSA salute, but nonetheless, this overhead has given us quite the security layer, and yesterday had the chance to talk with Acting Director Cogswell about the next generation of technology we will be deploying at airports. But both at our airports with individual travelers and our cargo containers, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory continues to stay ahead on cutting-edge technology, and we appreciate the work of our R&D labs in helping us maintain security.

I also appreciate your candor regarding a recent diversion of TSA resources to the southern border. I spoke to you about a letter that was sent by my colleague Senator Wicker and I about the diversion of those resources. My guess is we’ll have a chance to ask you in this morning’s hearing about that. Reports indicated at the time that there could be an additional FAMs deployed, with an ultimate goal of sending 175 to support the CBP operations, so I look forward to asking you about those questions this morning.

So, as my colleague said, we’re here to review what we can do to make sure that the TSA remains a strong and viable force. I remain very interested in the canine units’ success and the further deployment of that as one of the fastest growing airports, if not the fastest growing airport in the nation, Sea-Tac, the challenges of moving people and making sure that we’re all secure is a very very important daily task. So thank you for being here to address these issues.

 

Committee Announces Hearing on Mass Violence and Digital Responsibility

U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., chairman of the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, will convene a hearing titled, “Mass Violence, Extremism, and Digital Responsibility,” at 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, September 18, 2019. In light of recent incidents of mass violence, this hearing will examine the proliferation of extremism online and explore the effectiveness of industry efforts to remove violent content from online platforms. Witnesses will discuss how technology companies are working with law enforcement when violent or threatening content is identified and the processes for removal of such content.

<p>This morning we reflect on a somber

This morning we reflect on a somber day in American history. It was exactly 18 years ago that terrorists turned civilian aircraft into weapons killing nearly 3,000 Americans and injuring thousands more. Today, we honor the memories of those who perished and those first responders who ran into harm’s way to help their fellow citizens.

The tragedy of 9/11 led to the creation of the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) within the new Department of Homeland Security. TSA is charged with protecting our nation’s transportation systems from attacks and ensuring freedom of movement of people and commerce. 

I am pleased that Acting Deputy Administrator Patricia Cogswell is here to update the committee on TSA’s progress toward achieving these goals. 

America’s air, land, and marine transportation systems are designed for accessibility and efficiency. The enduring challenge remains how to deter and respond to terrorist attacks without unduly burdening travel, the economy, and civil liberties.

TSA’s workforce also includes Transportation Security Inspectors, Federal Air Marshals, and Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response Teams among other security professionals. 

Congress has worked to support this dedicated workforce by passing the first-ever TSA reauthorization bill – the TSA Modernization Act – in last year’s FAA Reauthorization legislation. The Modernization Act included provisions to:

  • Streamline acquisition;
  • Expand the PreCheck program;
  • Support the Screening Partnership Program;
  • Mandate more rigorous background checks of airport workers,
  • Strengthen airport access controls; and
  • Enhance security in public areas of airports.

Thus far, TSA has done an admiral job of responding to the myriad of directives and reporting requirements of the bill. However, I remain concerned about the pace of TSA’s deployment of new screening technology, the rate of PreCheck expansion, the seeming lack of urgency for implementing Screening Partnership Program reforms, and the absence of a comprehensive plan to integrate the Registered Traveler program with Credential Authentication Technology systems. I hope that our witness today will address the agency’s progress toward implementing the Modernization Act

In addition to this act implementation, the committee will also exercise oversight on reforms to existing security programs, notably the Passenger Screening teams.  In February, Administrator Pekoske briefed the committee on disturbing testing results from the IG and promised to revamp canine training. TSA has also committed to making the Federal Air Marshals program more intelligence-based.

Improving today’s frontline security programs is important, but TSA must adapt to changing threats and technologies. The committee is interested in emerging technology, including biometrics – perhaps we will hear about that today. We understand that TSA has a Biometrics Roadmap, but we certainly need to review this in light of concerns involving privacy, data protection, and civil liberties.  

So, I look forward to a robust discussion today on the vital role that TSA plays.

Protecting the Nation’s Transportation Systems: Oversight of the Transportation Security Administration

U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., chairman of the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, will convene a hearing titled, “Protecting the Nation’s Transportation Systems: Oversight of the Transportation Security Administration,” at 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, September 11, 2019. This hearing will examine issues related to the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and provide oversight on TSA’s efforts to enhance transportation security.

Transforming Rural America: A New Era of Innovation

U.S. Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., chairman of the Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, Innovation, and the Internet, will convene a hearing titled, “Transforming Rural America: A New Era of Innovation,” at 1:30 p.m. CST on Thursday, September 5, 2019. This hearing will examine the innovations high-speed broadband services bring to rural America in a variety of sectors such as agriculture, education, health care, and small business. The hearing will also explore the need to bring additional reliable broadband connectivity to rural America.

 Witnesses:

  • The Honorable Brendan Carr, Commissioner, Federal Communications Commission
  • Dr. José-Marie Griffiths, President, Dakota State University
  • Ms. Deanna Larson, President, Avera eCARE
  • Mr. Mark Shlanta, Chief Executive Officer, SDN Communications
  • Mr. Craig Snyder, Chief Executive Officer, VIKOR Teleconstruction
  • Dr. Michael Adelaine, Vice President for Technology and Security, South Dakota State University

*Witness list subject to change

Hearing Details:

Thursday, September 5, 2019
1:30 p.m. CST
Field Hearing
Southeast Technical Institute
2320 North Career Avenue
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 57107

Witness testimony, opening statements, and a live video of the hearing will be available on www.commerce.senate.gov.

Wicker Statement on Automakers’ Agreement to Use Technology to Prevent Deaths in Hot Cars

U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, issued the following statement on the Auto Alliance and Global Automakers’ commitment to install rear seat reminder systems in new vehicles.

Committee Announces Hearing on Oversight of TSA

U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., chairman of the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, will convene a hearing titled, “Protecting the Nation’s Transportation Systems: Oversight of the Transportation Security Administration,” at 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, September 11, 2019. This hearing will examine issues related to the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and provide oversight on TSA’s efforts to enhance transportation security.

South Dakota Field Hearing on Broadband Services in Rural America

WASHINGTON – U.S. Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., chairman of the Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, Innovation, and the Internet, will convene a hearing titled, “Transforming Rural America: A New Era of Innovation,” at 1:30 p.m. CST on Thursday, September 5, 2019. This hearing will examine the innovations high-speed broadband services bring to rural America in a variety of sectors such as agriculture, education, health care, and small business. The hearing will also explore the need to bring additional reliable broadband connectivity to rural America.

 Witnesses:

  • The Honorable Brendan Carr, Commissioner, Federal Communications Commission
  • Dr. José-Marie Griffiths, President, Dakota State University
  • Ms. Deanna Larson, President, Avera eCARE
  • Mr. Mark Shlanta, Chief Executive Officer, SDN Communications
  • Mr. Craig Snyder, Chief Executive Officer, VIKOR Teleconstruction
  • Dr. Michael Adelaine, Vice President for Technology and Security, South Dakota State University

*Witness list subject to change

Hearing Details:

Thursday, September 5, 2019
1:30 p.m. CST
Field Hearing
Southeast Technical Institute
2320 North Career Avenue
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 57107

Witness testimony, opening statements, and a live video of the hearing will be available on www.commerce.senate.gov.

Copyright

© 2018 Women Construction Owners & Executives USA
WCOE grows your contacts, contracts & bottom line